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2017 Point Standings
After Sonoma
Rank Driver Points

1 Josef Newgarden 642
2 Simon Pagenaud 629
3 Scott Dixon 621
4 Helio Castroneves 598
5 Will Power 562
6 Graham Rahal 522
7 Alexander Rossi 494
8 Takuma Sato 441
9 Ryan Hunter-Reay 421
10 Tony Kanaan 403
11 Max Chilton 396
12 Marco Andretti 388
13 James Hinchcliffe 376
14 Ed Jones 354
15 JR Hildebrand 347
16 Carlos Munoz 328
17 Charlie Kimball 327
18 Conor Daly 305
19 Mikhail Aleshin 237
20 Spencer Pigot 218
21 Sebastien Bourdais 214
22 Ed Carpenter 169
23 Gabby Chaves 98
24 Juan Pablo Montoya 93
25 Esteban Gutierrez 91
26 Sebastian Saavedra 80
27 Oriol Servia 61
28 Jack Harvey 57
29 Fernando Alonso 47
30 Pippa Mann 32
31 Zachary Claman DeMelo 26
32 Jay Howard 24
33 Zach Veach 23
34 Sage Karam 23
35 James Davison 21
36 Tristan Vautier 15
37 Buddy Lazier 14

Rookie of Year Standings
1. Ed Jones 354
2. Esteban Gutierrez 91
3. Jack Harvey 57
4. Fernando Alonso 47
5. Zach Veach 23

Manufacturer Standings
1. Chevy 1489
2. Honda 1326

So You Want To Drive The Indy 500?

by Stephen Cox
Sunday, February 26, 2017

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Conor Daly
Conor Daly

We've suspected this for many years and now it's official. The Indianapolis 500 is no longer a reasonable aspiration for most racing drivers.

Indianapolis Motor Speedway (IMS) president Doug Boles was kind enough to talk with me briefly at the annual PRI trade show in Indy. I asked him what his plan was to increase the number of entries at the Indianapolis 500. His answer took me by surprise.

"We grew up falling in love with the sport when you had that number of entries," Boles said. "A lot of those entries were guys who sat around in December and said, 'You know what? We're going to build a car in our garage and we're going to enter it at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway for the Indy 500.'"

"But first and foremost in my mind is just really safety. I don't think it makes sense for us to get back to fifty or sixty cars just from a safety standpoint," Boles continued. "I'd love to see fifty or sixty or seventy cars entering and guys just being able to decide that they have a driver who's running at Putnamville and we're going to give him a shot to run at the Speedway. I just don't think it's practical anymore."

Ryan Hunter-Reay
Ryan Hunter-Reay

Let that statement sink in. American short track drivers -- who routinely filled the field until the 1980s -- are now considered unsafe and incapable of running the Indy 500.

Don't ever go back to the speedway and expect to find the next A. J. Foyt or Parnelli Jones. There won't be one. Nor will you ever see another Stan Fox or Rich Vogler claw their way up through the ranks and make it to Indy.

For that matter, we're also unlikely to ever see another Rick Mears or Robby Gordon. Those guys got to Indy through off-road desert racing, not Indycar's current ladder system. They would likely be considered unsafe at the speedway today.

Boles countered by saying, "We have the best on-track product that we've ever had in the history of the speedway with the last five years. The number of lead changes we have, the number of cars in the field that have a chance of winning it."

True, recent events have had a certain NASCAR-green-white-checkered-overtime excitement to them. However, this was not achieved by eliminating drivers of sprint cars, off road trucks, midgets, late models or amateur sports cars from the speedway. It was achieved -- if indeed, this can be called an "achievement" at all -- through regulation. 

More teams are in contention because everyone is forced to use the same spec car. The additional lead changes were artificially created through "push to pass" legislation and turbo boost mandates.

Using this logic, even better races could be manufactured by enacting a rule disqualifying anyone who leads two consecutive laps, thus assuring 249 lead changes in every Indy 500. 

The bottom line is this -- SCCA drivers are welcome to compete at IMS in the Run Offs. SVRA drivers are welcome to Indy's vintage event. Short track drivers are welcome to buy tickets and sit in Turn Three.

But the speedway has no intention of enlarging the field past 33 cars and creating space that could be filled by new drivers from other disciplines. That is bad news for thousands of very good racing drivers worldwide. And it is even worse news for the Indianapolis 500 itself, whose relevancy continues to fade.

Stephen Cox
Sopwith Motorsports Television Productions
Co-host, Mecum Auctions on NBCSN

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