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After Laguna Seca
Rank Driver Points

1 Newgarden, Josef 641
2 Pagenaud, Simon 616
3 Rossi, Alexander 608
4 Dixon, Scott 578
5 Power, Will 550
6 Rosenqvist, Felix (R) 425
7 Herta, Colton (R) 420
8 Hunter-Reay, Ryan 420
9 Sato, Takuma 415
10 Rahal, Graham 389
11 Bourdais, Sebastien 387
12 Hinchcliffe, James 370
13 Ferrucci, Santino (R) 351
14 Pigot, Spencer 335
15 Kanaan, Tony 304
16 Andretti, Marco 303
17 Ericsson, Marcus (R) 290
18 Veach, Zach 271
19 Leist, Matheus 261
20 Jones, Ed 217
21 Harvey, Jack 186
22 Chilton, Max 184
23 Carpenter, Ed 161
24 Daly, Conor 149
25 Kimball, Charlie 117
26 O'Ward, Patricio (R) 115
27 Karam, Sage 39
28 Davison, James 36
29 Castroneves, Helio 33
30 Hanley, Ben (R) 31
31 Mann, Pippa 28
32 Kaiser, Kyle (R) 22
33 Hildebrand, JR 20
34 Servia, Oriol 16
35 Enerson, RC (R) 13
36 King, Jordan (R) 12

Rookie of Year Standings
1 Rosenqvist, Felix 425
2 Herta, Colton 420
3 Ferrucci, Santino 351
4 Ericsson, Marcus 290
5 O'Ward, Patricio 115
6 Hanley, Ben 31
7 Kaiser, Kyle 22
8 RC Enerson 13
9 King, Jordan 12

Manufacturer Standings
1. Honda 1436
2. Chevy 1387

Dan Wheldon, Five Years On

by Brian Carroccio
Sunday, October 16, 2016

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Dan Wheldon with the Borg-Warner Trophy after winning the 2011 Indianapolis 500
Dan Wheldon with the Borg-Warner Trophy after winning the 2011 Indianapolis 500
Today is the five-year anniversary of two-time Indianapolis 500 winner Dan Wheldon’s passing. Below, is an article written by AR1 Senior Columnist Brian Carroccio, which appeared on AutoRacing1, a few days after Wheldon succumbed to injuries from a horrific accident at Las Vegas Motor Speedway.

It’s been nearly 72 hours since INDYCAR CEO Randy Bernard announced the death of Dan Wheldon. Wheldon's car, of course, became airborne during Sunday's series finale at Las Vegas Motor Speedway during a horrific 15-car pileup. Gruesomely, the 2005 series champion and two time Indianapolis 500 winner hit the catch fence cockpit first, and likely died soon thereafter. Wheldon is survived by his wife Susie, and two young sons Sebastien, two, and Oliver, 7 months.

The reaction from the IndyCar community has been one of varied emotions, ranging from shock over the death of a man who seemed larger than life, to inexplicable sadness for the wife and two young sons he left behind, to that of raw anger over what many deem a senseless death on a track too dangerous for modern Indy Cars.

And while the subject of safety, particularly running Indy Cars on banked oval tracks designed primarily for stock cars, is a relevant one that INDYCAR must address, today we will celebrate Dan Wheldon, the man; the man we began to view very differently after his improbable Indianapolis 500 victory last May; a man seemingly in the prime of his life; the champion racer and person, who left us way too soon.

Dan Wheldon en route to his first Indy win in 2005

A native of Emberton, England, Dan Wheldon came to America in the late 1990s in hopes of moving his way up the open-wheel racing ladder. Lacking the funding many young racers enjoy, Wheldon nevertheless, excelled in the junior formulae. In 2002, he earned a late season two-race deal with Panther Racing in the Indy Racing League (IRL). His big break would come the following year, when he was signed by Andretti Green Racing (AGR) to replace a then retiring Michael Andretti. By 2004, Wheldon had established himself as an IndyCar star, as he visited victory lane 3 times and finished second in the series championship.

While he was carving a formidable niche on the track, Wheldon also emerged as one of the more colorful personalities in the IndyCar paddock.  Always sporting a smile, clearly comfortable in his own skin, and always looking for the camera, Wheldon talked fast and often, displaying a brash, youthful self-confidence some found endearing, others not.  And in fairness, Wheldon's endless going and gushing about how great the IRL was or how wonderful his (insert multiple sponsors here) team du jour was, at times, sounded a little forced and contrived.

And at times, we saw a petulant side to the precocious Brit.  When he won his first Indy 500 in 2005, Wheldon of course, battled with then-rookie sensation Danica Patrick, who ultimately finished fourth, late in the race.  When the attractive Patrick received the lion's share of the media attention appeared and even appeared on the cover of Sports Illustrated Wheldon was none too thrilled. At the next race, he sported a t-shirt that said "I actually won the 500." The act wasn't received well, and Wheldon came off looking bitter and entitled.

He could also be, shall we say, a little vain. Of course, he had his crooked British teeth drastically and ostentatiously redone shortly after winning Indy, giving him the most expensive smile on the grid. It was also reported that Wheldon owned in excess of 100 shoes, many of which he would travel with. Fellow drivers use to hide his numerous shoes, something the young Wheldon apparently did not find much humor in.

Petulance, vanity, and immaturity aside, Wheldon was a badass on track, particularly ovals, where he scored 15 of his 16 career victories.  After, the 2005 season, he parlayed his Indy 500 and IRL championship season into a ride with the powerful Ganassi team. With Ganassi, he remained a regular in victory lane. However, he was never able to capture the same dominant form of 2005.

Wheldon in 2009

Wheldon endured some frustrating seasons in 2009 and 2010. As IndyCar racing became more of a road and street course racing discipline, the oval proficient Wheldon found scoring top finishes to be more difficult. In 2008, he finished fourth in the series championship, but was clearly outclassed by his Ganassi teammate Scott Dixon. The Kiwi won 6 races, the Indy 500 and the series championship that year.

With the growing belief that Wheldon could not be a front-running road racer, team owner Chip Ganassi began a public flirtation with AGR driver Tony Kanaan. While Kanaan ultimately decided to stay with AGR, the damage between Ganassi and the prideful Wheldon was done. Wheldon decided he would leave Ganassi racing and rejoin Panther Racing. He ran well at times with Panther, including runner-up finishes at Indy in 2009 and 2010, but never made it to victory lane. When the 2010 season came to an end, Panther and Wheldon went their separate ways. And the split from Panther was like Wheldon's split from Ganassi: less than amicable.

At 32, with the reputation of being an oval specialist and having left two teams on unfavorable terms, Wheldon found himself at a career crossroads. The ebullient and brash former champion, was now seen as something of a prickly, entitled diva, with a skill set not suited for the modern IndyCar schedule. His 2005 championship seemed a distant memory, of a bygone era. Wheldon was unable to secure a full time ride for 2011, and settled for an Indy 500-only deal with start-up operation Bryan Herta Autosport (BHA).

Wheldon and BHA arrived in Indianapolis last May, without much fanfare. While Wheldon's Indy record was impressive, and he ran strong during practice and qualifying, few thought he had the team behind him to win. Wheldon, however, kept flashing those pearly whites, insisting that BHA would be a factor come race day.

Of course, knowing Wheldon's tendency to embellish, many simply dismissed the corny Brit with the goofy hair and absurdly expensive smile. However, something about Wheldon seemed different. He seemed at ease. He was self-deprecating. He gushed over his wife Susie, and two adorable sons. He talked about the joy of being a father, and how lucky he was to be running for his good friend Bryan Herta. There was no sense of bitterness after being left out in the cold by the IndyCar community.  The entitlement and prickliness of years before was never apparent, while the characteristic charisma and charm were better than ever.  Were we witnessing a more mature and more likable Dan Wheldon?

Everything that happened during that magical month of May and after would indicate, yes!  Wheldon drove a characteristically heady race and found himself in the mix in the closing laps. As variable pit strategies began to play out, rookie J.R. Hildebrand, who replaced Wheldon at Panther, seemed poised to score an upset victory.

Wheldon goes past Hildebrand to score a shock win

J.R. Hildebrand's inexplicable last lap crash opened the door for Wheldon to score his 2nd 500 win. However, on the race's final lap, Hildebrand, shockingly, hit the turn 4 wall. Wheldon, who had moved up to second the lap before, opportunistically passed Hildebrand before the start/finish line to score his second Indy win. The victory celebration was classic Wheldon. He kissed the bricks, rolled on the ground, poured milk all over himself. Noting that his contract expired at midnight after the race, Wheldon had plenty of time to bask in the glory.

Suddenly, a driver, who a few months ago, no one wanted was thrust into an unlikely role. The ride less Wheldon had essentially become, outside of Mario Andretti, IndyCar's most famous and charismatic ambassador, a role he relished. Over the next days and weeks, those pearly whites were everywhere: Good Morning America, New York City, Letterman, and Disney to name a few. When he filled in during IndyCar television broadcasts, he was a smash.

Wheldon in 2011 testing the car that now bears his initials

The once prickly, petulant Brit had become a proud husband and father, and one of the sport's most beloved figures, who seemed to be entering the prime of his life. We learned after his death Sunday, that he and wife Susie received matching tattoos in Vegas the Saturday before. The tattoo artist, who did not know them, mentioned how in love the two seemed to be, and how much of a joy Wheldon was to be around. From a racing standpoint, Wheldon had been selected as the test and development driver for the 2012 Indy Car, and he slated to be back in the series with AGR full time next year.

Sadly, we'll never know how Wheldon's second act would have played out, as he was taken from us in cruel and sudden fashion Sunday. The IndyCar community will no doubt remain in grief for some time over this sudden and shocking loss.

However, if there is solace that can be found, it is the fact that over the past few months, we saw Dan Wheldon at his absolute best. On track, we saw one of the Indianapolis’ greats pull off an improbable win, no one saw coming.  Off track, we saw a proud father, who appeared to be at peace, and had flourished in his role as ambassador for this sport we all love.

That will be my lasting memory of the great Dan Wheldon. May he rest in peace.

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